Starting Check Number [What Is It When Ordering Checks?]

Do you know you can request your bank to start your checks with a number of your choice? There are good reasons why you shouldn’t start your checks with zero, more so if you’re only starting a new checking account. So, what is the starting check number when ordering checks?

The starting check number is the number of your first check for your check order, whether it’s an existing checking account or a new one. The check printing company will ask for this information to complete your check orders.

Read on to learn more about the starting check number, how to read a check, and ordering and re-ordering checks.

Starting Check Number

 starting check number

When you order checks for your checking account, you will be asked for the starting check number. If you already have an existing checking account, you’ll want to start sequentially where your last check ended. That’s not necessarily the rule, as you can start your checks with any number, but keeping your check orders sequentially ordered makes recording and tracking much easier.

Starting check number is the number of your first check for your check order, whether it’s an existing checking account or a new one.

If you’re opening a new checking account, it’s a good idea to have your starting check number at 1000. Although rare, some establishments might not accept your check if it has a low check number. This is for varied reasons like fraud and fear that the check won’t clear because it indicates a new account.

In reality, a check number shouldn’t matter if it’s a low number or a high number, just as long as it clears. Banks are actually aware of this, so starter checks usually have a starting check number at 1000.

How to Read a Check [Parts of a Check]

To write a check, you must be able to know how to read a check. Sometimes, it may be intimidating to write a check, what with all the information on that small piece of paper. Let’s take a look at each information that’s on the check:

1. Check Number [and Starting Check Number]

This is a number given for that specific check alone. While the checking account number and the ABA routing number usually stay the same, the check number will be different for every check. It is good to write down the check number for records purposes and for what was issued.

Low check numbers usually signal that the issuer has a new checking account, and so, it is advised to take caution with the acceptance of these checks. This is also why it’s a good idea to have your starting check number with a not-so-low number like 1000.

As mentioned earlier, the starting check number is the number of your first check for your check order, whether it’s an existing checking account or a new one.

2. Personal Information

On the top left corner, the personal info shows details about the owner of the checking account. The amount written on the check will come from the person’s account. Personal information is available on the check. This is in case one needs to contact the issuer.

3. Payee Line

You will see who the check is written to or the person receiving the money on the Payee line. The receiver should have his or her name written exactly as it is on his bank account to avoid any problems. Sometimes, the payee line can be payable to “cash” this means that whoever deposits the check to his or her bank account will receive the amount payable.

4. Dollar Box

Inside this box, you’ll find the amount the check is issued for in numbers with the currency. This gives you a glance at how much was issued. The amount is also in words in a different area of the check. Ideally, it should match the amount that’s written in words.

5. Check Amount

This is the amount of the check written in words. If there is any discrepancy between the amount in words and the amount in numerals, the bank follows the amount written in words. This is the official amount of the check.

6. Memo Line

This is found on the bottom left corner of your check, and you may or may not use the space. It’s good, though, to note down what the payment was for, for instance, “Rent for June.” Some checks may not have the memo line, but if you want to note down what the payment was for, it’s perfectly ok to write on the left corner of the check.

7. Date Line

On this line, you’ll see when the issuer wrote the check. There will be some instances where you’ll see a check with a date in the future written on the dateline. These checks are called post-dated checks.

They’re used mainly when someone hands you in advance a check meant as payment for something that will be due in the future. Most banks will accept checks that have been dated for up to 6 months in the past.

8. Signature Line

The line shows the signature of the owner of the check. If you have received a check with no signature, the check won’t be accepted as valid so contact the person who issued the check.

9. Bank Name

This tells you what bank the check writer has a checking account with and that the funds will come from that bank. You can cash the check at the bank to receive the full amount if it isn’t cross-checked. Most of the time, though, you need to go to the particular bank branch where the check writer has his or her account.

10. ABA Routing Number

The ABA Routing number is a special address for financial institutions to find the check writer’s bank. This will appear on a check as the “funny” looking numbers which the bank’s computers can read.

11. Checking Account Number

The checking account number is the account number where the amount on the check will come from.

12. Bank Fractional Number

This is another kind of the bank address that banks use to identify the bank origin.

13. Back of Check

The back of the check is where the person who will deposit the check endorses the check. The person who was issued the check signs the back of the check. This is also where the bank stamps information about the check and details of its handling. For this purpose, you need to leave the back of the check blank (except for the depositor’s signature) for the bank’s use.

Again, what is a starting check number when ordering checks? The starting check number is your first check for your check order, whether it’s an existing checking account or a new one. The check printers will ask for this information to complete your check orders.

What should my starting check number be? If you’re opening a new checking account, it’s a good idea to make your starting check number be 1000. Although rare, an establishment might not accept your check if the starting check number is too low. This is for varied reasons like fraud and fear that the check won’t clear because it indicates a new account.

What I Need To Open a Checking Account

what is starting check number

If you’re opening a checking account, more importantly, if it’s your first checking account, we already mentioned that it would be a good idea to have your starting check number start at 1000 or an even higher number, if possible. By doing so, it doesn’t signal that your checking account is new, and so your payees won’t have any hesitations to accept your check.

So how do you open a checking account? What do you need? Here are the documents that you need to have ready:

1. A Government-issued Identification Card

You’ll be asked for a valid government-issued ID with a photo. This is, so they will check who you really are and match your name to your face. Your driver’s license will be good enough and/or a valid passport.

2. Social Security Card and Tax Identification Number

The bank will ask for your Social Security Number (SSN) to open a checking account. Bring your Social Security card with you for verification. If you don’t have a Social Security number, you can give them your individual tax identification number. You need to show proof of your ITIN.

3. Proof of Billing Address

You have to show a billing or a credit card statement in your name that shows your current address. Some banks will let you open a checking account with a post office box but will still ask you to show your current address. Be ready with the latest copy of any utility bill, credit card statement.

Ordering Checks For A Checking Account

starting check number when ordering checks

Whether you’re opening a new checking account or have a current one, you’ll need to order and re-order checks. Below are 7 steps for ordering checks for a checking account:

Step One

Some banks will give you free checks when you open your checking account. First, ask your bank if they will give you your first set free of charge. If they do, you’ll save a few bucks and won’t need to order right away.

Step Two

Many people order their checks online as they’re usually cheaper than buying from the bank. Look for online sites that sell checks. Many have personalized checks, and they have many check designs to choose from.

Step Three

Choose the check design you want. There are so many possibilities here. You can have plain colored ones or personalized designs. Or you can also have your checks done according to functionality. Lastly, you may have them do single checks or duplicate checks that come with a carbon layer for easier tracking of your payees.

Step Four

Complete the details on the order form. This will include the routing number, your checking account number, your personal information, and your bank details.

As mentioned earlier, the starting check number of a check number is the number of your first check for your check order, whether it’s an existing checking account or a new one. You can choose any starting check number.

Step Five

Choose a check starting number. If you’re opening a checking account, you’ll most probably think of starting with number 1. However, you shouldn’t do this because merchants aren’t willing to accept checks that start with a low number. You can start with 1000 or even 2000. If you’re doing a re-order, put as starting check number the next number after your last check.

Step Six

Let them know if it’s an order for delivery or if you’re picking up the checks. Give them your details if you let them ship your checks. Let them also know if it’s a rush order or not. They might charge a little more for rush orders, and the shipping fee might be more for priority mail.

Step Seven

When you receive your order, thoroughly check if they print it all correctly. If something is wrong, the printer should be able to replace them. If there are no mistakes, then you can start using the checks.

Conclusion: What Is Starting Check Number When Ordering Checks

Starting check number is the number of your first check for your check order, whether it’s an existing checking account or a new one. The check printers will ask for this information to complete your check orders.

Remember, if you’re opening a new checking account, it would be good to have your starting check number at 1000 or even 2000 because businesses can sometimes be hesitant to accept checks with low numbers.

For re-ordering checks for older checking accounts, your starting check number would be the number after the last check on your checkbook. It’s a good idea to keep your checks in sequential order for easier recording.